The stresses on words and the rythmn of poetry

​The best way to read poetry is aloud. 

The choice of words the amount of syllables and the arrangement of lines will dictate the rhythm

The time taken to say the word will depend on the amount of syllables and where the stress lies. 

Punctuation affects rhythmn .

Line stops or the running of two lines into the other…also in speech the normal pause for a breath will change the way we read the lines.
We always use natural stress but learning and accent sometimes changes where the stresses go.

With writing one needs to stick to where the natural stresses are in words unless writing a poem in dialect
Where is the natural stress for you in the following words?

Credit  credit, controversy, controversy British British ??
Sometimes the stress will change according to the meaning or nature of the word. 

Some times circumstances will change circumstances
 For example if you took the Dr Seuss Poem  Green Eggs and Ham. You might read it so the stresses go like this:
 i DO not EAT green EGGS and HAM  

If you placed the stresses elsewhere, it might change the meaning of the poem:

 I do NOT eat GREEN eggs AND ham.
 This might suggest that the character would eat them separately but not together and it would not go with the rest of the poem. If you translated this stress change into sound it might go like this

 I do NOT eat GREEN eggs AND ham. 

DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da. 
In terms of inflection in the first example the line ends on a rising tone in the second on a lowering tone. 
American English and British English often put different stresses on words and although there is some commonality there are also distinct differences. 
It needs some thought if writing for an international audience. Does it matter ?

What do you think? 


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